Wolfgang Baatz


Lecture | Monday 10.12.2012 | 19:00h | R211a 


Lecture Series: Parallax Views on Architecture

Conservation of Cultural Heritage:
Decisionmaking Processes

Conservation of cultural heritage is an issue which as a concrete task may seem self-evident at first sight in public awareness. Nevertheless, the specific decisions how to preserve directly affect not only the material aspects and physical condition of an object but also its interpretation. In consequence, those who take the decisions take not only the responsibility for its physical stability but also for its appearance, which will affect the appreciation of the object by society as well as by future generations.
In order to comply with this fact, activities of preservation may not lack awareness of the many aspects which have to be taken into account. Conservation-restoration has to be based on the understanding of the appearance, meaning, material composition, and condition of the cultural heritage object as interdependent parameters and their relevance to the decision-making process.
 

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Wolfgang Baatz


Lecture | Monday 10.12.2012 | 19:00h | R211a 


Lectureseries: Parallax Views on Architecture

Wolfgang Baatz has been teaching conservation-restoration at the Academy of Fine Arts Vienna since 1994. After Conservation and Technology (Academy of Fine Arts Vienna 1978) he studied chemistry (TU Vienna 1993). Worked as freelance conservator-restorer, ample activities, mainly conservation of mural paintings. Co-founder (1997) and Chairman (2010-) of ENCoRE (European Network for Conservation-Restoration Education).

 

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Wolfgang Baatz


Lecture | Monday 10.12.2012 | 19:00h | R211a 


Lectureseries: Parallax Views on Architecture

Parallax is the displacement or difference in the apparent position of an object caused by a new line of sight. We all use this difference to gain depth perception. Astronomers use it to define the distance and outline of far away objects. Meanwhile Slavoj Zizek argues that the parallax gap causes not only an “epistemological” shift in the subject's point of view, but always reflects an “ontological” shift in the object itself, as subject and object are inherently mediated.

In seeking the oscillation between focus and productive indeterminacy, this year’s lecture series at the Institute of Art and Architecture examines the production of space from multiple points of view. And as nearby objects have a larger parallax than distant ones, we invite artists and researchers working in our immediate proximity–artists and researchers within the Academy of Fine Arts Vienna–who look at the subject of architecture and urbanism implicitly or explicitly in their work. As a result the lecture series will offer an array of alternate positions coexisting within the Academy and create a platform for transdisciplinary discussions at the intersection between art and architecture.  (Stefan Gruber)