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Nic Clear

Lecture | Monday 09.11.2015 | 19:00h | R211a


Lecture Series | Visionary Cities: Utopian Urbanism and Science Fiction

Lecture 02
Science Fictions of the Avant Garde

When

With the emergence of the architectural avant-gardes at the beginning of the C20th that the conditions to create truly technologically inspired speculative architectures arose and it is significant that two of the most advanced uses of speculative architecture came from countries whose economies were still essentially agrarian, perhaps it was the absence of those new technologies that created the most potent conditions for the architectural experimentations that took place.

Of all the early C20th avant-gardes the Italian Futurists were perhaps the most extreme expression of the rejection of the ‘old’ and an almost ecstatic embrace of new. Founded by Filippo Tommaso Marinetti with the publication of The Futurist Manifesto in 1909, Marinetti became infamous for his proselytising of speed, dynamism and new technology, including the technologies of war and with the young Antonio Sant’ Elia the conception of a new ‘Futurist’ city took dramatic shape.

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Visionary Cities:

Utopian Urbanism and Science Fiction


Nic Clear | Endowed Professorship for Research in Visionary Cities | Lecture Series Winterterm 2015|16

In parallel with this a group of revolutionary Russian artists and architects developed an architectural language that combined the abstract expressive forms of Suprematism, the tectonics of industrial construction with an agit prop sensibility of social transformation. Working under the collective title of Constructivism, this group of architects and designers attempted create an architecture that would combine radical politics with radical attitudes to form via the use of advanced technology, with Vladimir Tatlin’s Monument to Fourth International as their iconic project.

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Visionary Cities:

Utopian Urbanism and Science Fiction


Nic Clear | Endowed Professorship for Research in Visionary Cities | Lecture Series Winterterm 2015|16

Nic Clear is Head of Department of Architecture and Landscape at the University of Greenwich, where he also teaches a postgraduate design unit that specialises in the use of film and animation in the generation, development and representation of architectural spaces. Nic is particularly interested in the intersection between architecture and Science Fiction. He edited an edition of AD titled Architectures of the Near Future and has written the Architecture section of the Oxford Handbook to Science Fiction.