© Nic Clear

Nic Clear

Lecture | Monday 12.10.2015 | 19:00h | R211a


Lecture Series | Visionary Cities: Utopian Urbanism and Science Fiction

When

Lecture 01
Introduction: A Strange Newness

When discussing science fiction and Architecture it is usual to look at the architecture ‘in’ science fiction and in particular in science fiction films. In this first lecture that relationship will be flipped and it will be the Science Fiction in Architecture that will be discussed. The lecture will begin to map out concepts where an idea of architectural movements and projects can be viewed explicitly ‘as’ science fiction. Central to this will be identifying the importance of Darko Suvin’s definition of science fiction as ‘a strange newness’ containing some form of ‘novum’, alongside Adam Roberts’ argument that the genre should be more accurately called technology fiction. Another theme is Frederic Jameson’s notion, following Suvin, that the whole genre utopian thought should be considered a sub-set of science fiction itself.

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Visionary Cities:

Utopian Urbanism and Science Fiction


Nic Clear | Endowed Professorship for Research in Visionary Cities | Lecture Series Winterterm 2015|16

To further develop this argument I shall be briefly looking at some of the possible origins of an architectural science fiction discourse and relating my own interests in developing science fiction concepts as part of a critique of neoliberal late capitalism and highlighting some of the work I have produced, both written texts and design projects, as part of a contemporary utopian architecture.

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Visionary Cities:

Utopian Urbanism and Science Fiction


Nic Clear | Endowed Professorship for Research in Visionary Cities | Lecture Series Winterterm 2015|16

Nic Clear is Head of Department of Architecture and Landscape at the University of Greenwich, where he also teaches a postgraduate design unit that specialises in the use of film and animation in the generation, development and representation of architectural spaces. Nic is particularly interested in the intersection between architecture and Science Fiction. He edited an edition of AD titled Architectures of the Near Future and has written the Architecture section of the Oxford Handbook to Science Fiction.