Frank Lloyd Wright Broadacre City 1958  © Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation

Nic Clear

Lecture | Monday 23.11.2015 | 19:00h | R211a


Lecture Series | Visionary Cities: Utopian Urbanism and Science Fiction

Lecture 03
Industrial Cities and their Antithesis

When

At the beginning of the 20th century the concept of the city of the future was dominated by two competing narratives, the first looked forward to a dense collectivised industrial model dominated by machines and technology while the second saw a more rural mode of dispersed development based on a concept of urban sprawl and the hegemony of the individual.

For Tony Garnier technology was the means to achieve a fully socialist city, while for Le Corbusier it would bring about a hygienic utopia of light and air facilitated by new building typologies and rigorous zoning.

In stark contrast Frank Lloyd Wright saw suburbanisation and a semi-rural structure of individual dwellings as the most effective means of accommodating the future.

 

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Visionary Cities:

Utopian Urbanism and Science Fiction


Nic Clear | Endowed Professorship for Research in Visionary Cities | Lecture Series Winterterm 2015|16

Both of these positions drew on concepts that had been extensively developed within the genre of the ‘scientific romance’; from the spectacular technological societies of Verne and Wells to the medievalism of Morris and the ‘boys own’ adventure stories of the Pulp magazines, the city/country and industry/nature debates were already firmly established as part of the popular psyche.

 

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Visionary Cities:

Utopian Urbanism and Science Fiction


Nic Clear | Endowed Professorship for Research in Visionary Cities | Lecture Series Winterterm 2015|16

Nic Clear is Head of Department of Architecture and Landscape at the University of Greenwich, where he also teaches a postgraduate design unit that specialises in the use of film and animation in the generation, development and representation of architectural spaces. Nic is particularly interested in the intersection between architecture and Science Fiction. He edited an edition of AD titled Architectures of the Near Future and has written the Architecture section of the Oxford Handbook to Science Fiction.