© Christina Condak

Matrix Maytricks


BArch 1 Studio

Christina Condak | Eva Sommeregger

In the opening sequence of Alfred Hitchcock’s film Rear Window, the automatic blinds of Jeff’s apartment rise, and the camera leads us into the courtyard. It draws our vision into the backyard, looking around, introducing us to the neighbours and the built features of the set. For the rest of the film, this backyard is viewed from Jeff’s apartment. Hitchcock (who thought that architecture was very important for film directors) constructed the set entirely so that he could control the camera shots; for example, the choreographed moments of seeing the actions of all the inhabitants in their apartments, a play of simultaneous action in space, a kind of architectural section. The courtyard is an outdoor space, yet it is also an interior. And it is a main character of the film.

The walls and windows of the buildings around it contribute to the sense of spatial layering from one side to the other. It is not about an individual building as an object, but rather about space and architecture as a device, an organizing structure supporting the life of the inhabitants. People sleep on balconies, windows are mostly open, and the situation is summer and a heat wave. It is the relationships between all these things that make up this environment.

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Matrix Maytricks


BArch 1 Studio

Christina Condak | Eva Sommeregger

Jeff, a professional photographer, is the main protagonist of the film, and we are forced to experience everything through his eyes, from the compressed space of his apartment (the interior of his camera?), through the window (its aperture?).
Our work begins here. The camera. The eye. The moving eye. A protagonist. A space. A sequence through IKA’s new location. Recordings. Revelations. Realizations. A space to retreat for a protagonist. A window. A viewing device. All these exercises add up – recording, drawing, designing, building – and synthesize into one spatial matrix. An assembly of planes, walls, stairs, windows and devices confronts the matrix. Fragments pile up in the matrix. This is a testing ground for giving your protagonist a place to exist in the world, a place to extend and move, and above all to negotiate with his/her neighbours. Space is understood as transforming, subject to movement and time. Space is something in-between. Space is made through a series of relationships.

 

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