© Kristyna Sevcikova

Tools of Imagination


Master Studio: Analogue Digital Production

Michael Hansmeyer

Today, we can fabricate anything. Digital fabrication now functions on both the micro and macro scales, combining multiple materials and using different materialization processes. Complexity and customization are no longer impediments to design.
While we can fabricate anything, design arguably appears confined by our instruments of design: we can only design what we can directly represent. If one looks at 3D-printed artefacts, there is oftentimes a discrepancy between the wonders of technology and the conventionality of design. It seems that our current parametric approaches operate within a scope too tightly prescribed. We appear unable to exploit the new freedom that digital fabrication offers. In short: we can currently fabricate more than we can design.
What is needed is a new type of design instrument. We need tools for searching and exploration, rather than simply control and execution. These new tools should be simultaneously open and systematic, striking a balance between causality and chaos. They require a design language without the need for words and labels, as they should create things previously unseen.

>>

 

Tools of Imagination


Master Studio: Analogue Digital Production

Michael Hansmeyer

These tools must ultimately redefine the process of design: the designer will work in an iterative feedback loop with the machine, moderating processes and incorporating feedback, surprises and proposals. Knowledge and experience are acquired by searching, requiring heuristics that work in the absence of categorization. As yet, we have countless tools to increase our efficiency and precision. Why not also create tools that serve as our muses, inspire us and help us to be creative? Tools to draw the undrawable and to imagine the unimaginable. Tools to produce knowledge, tools for learning architecture.
More than ever, machines should enter into a productive dialogue with us in the design process. We need to move beyond rational instruction and arrive at intuitive interaction. In this studio, we will directly respond to Nicholas Negroponte’s demand in The Architecture Machine: »Let us build machines that can learn, can grope, and can fumble, machines that will be architectural partners, architecture machines.«

>>

 

Tools of Imagination


Master Studio: Analogue Digital Production

Michael Hansmeyer

What we stand to gain are entirely new spatial and haptic experiences. A playful design that stimulates the senses, elicits curiosity and invites interaction. A design environment that simultaneously allows control and surprise, and that embraces and celebrates the unforeseen.

> Link Booklet s16