© Edward George Lloyd, The Global Gold Commodity, 2015 (detail)

The Tears Of A Setting Sun

A Tale Of Tengabism, Gold And Textiles


Edward Lloyd

In John Hopkins analysis of Deleuze and Guattari’s "A Thousand Plateaus", place is either “(something) …that one occupies or something one crosses without owning or possessing”.

Until 1990 Mongolia was a land of the people, a thousand plateaus; uninterrupted space in which the Nomad existed in his independent battle with a world he never occupied. This assimilation of land for the purpose of selling off mining contracts to foreign investors was in direct contradiction to the UN’s Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples on which Mongolia was one of the 143 member states to sign the paper in favor, to 4 against.

Whilst great open pit mines drain the Gobi desert’s diminishing water supplies, convoys of mega-trucks create dust clouds so thick headlights are needed during the day. What little vegetation that kept the Nomad’s precarious battle with his world in fine balance has gone. Today the nomad is no longer a herder, instead propelled by the forces of a global commodity market and it’s lust for this precious metal, today’s nomad is the miner who provide over 13.5 tones a year of Mongolian gold, or over €520m at January 2015 average price.

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The Tears Of A Setting Sun

A Tale Of Tengabism, Gold And Textiles


Edward Lloyd

The National Geographic’s portrayal of the last frontier, the subsistent farmers grazing the planes of this rural landscape is 20years too late. Instead embroiled in a supply chain that spans the entire globe, the Nomads of Mongolia are reliant entirely upon the fluctuations in the price of gold. The following work explores occupation of place. It explores how our actions and rituals are used to construct identity. It explores how our identity is stored in the objects that surround us. The work consists of a series of interrelated artifacts, culminating in the construction of a fantastical new identity of the Mongolian Nomad. The artifacts build on the historic trade of silks and Buddhist relics through the region whose presence established the incredibly rich culture of these people.

In my work I extend these tradition of nomadic tribes of Mongolia to the present conditions described above, and in doing so express these conditions through a series of contemporary artefacts. The artefacts themselves work as tools to understand and communicate the architecture of the tribe that consists of permanent concrete living towers and temporary textile temples.

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The Tears Of A Setting Sun

A Tale Of Tengabism, Gold And Textiles


Edward Lloyd

Traditional architectural representation is transposed to that of the object, and in doing so acts as a prototype for the rewriting of a cultural identity. "The Tears Of A Setting Sun" does so whilst working with the dichotic relationship that runs through the veins of Mongolia, permanence and time. Most importantly my work serves as a paradigmatic example of how cultural values can be re-established within the nomadic communities of contemporary Mongolia.

Advisor: Hannes Stiefel

www.f-n-p.co.uk/