© Kristyna Sevcikova

Deep Space


BArch 2 Studio: Analogue Digital Production

Wolfgang Tschapeller | Werner Skvara

Laboratories, studios, seminars, desks and archives are some of the spaces where knowledge is produced: laboratories are spaces for experimentation in the natural sciences, studios are workshops for artists, seminars and — earlier — desks are places for knowledge production in cultural studies, and archives are the realm of historians. There appear to be at least fragmentary guidelines for the concrete physical aspects, dimensions and properties of some of these spaces.
A laboratory has to be devoid of properties. Its spatial contours are a product of the measurements of experimental equipment, and its shell is a composite of filters, controlled intake and exhaust conduits, and screens for and against magnetic fields. Its contact points with the ground are constructed in such a way that not even the slightest vibration from real space can enter into the experiment space. Then take archives. An archive is often a space constructed from a multiple of the archived material and has clear climatic requirements as well as the main task of conserving the material’s original state. As for traditional artists’ studios, we know that they had to have high ceilings and that a certain kind of light was achieved by means of large, north-facing windows.

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Deep Space


BArch 2 Studio: Analogue Digital Production

Wolfgang Tschapeller | Werner Skvara

Can traditional studios be considered as optical instruments? Later, the modern era demonstrated that a studio could take the form of a steel mill that hammers a tonne of steel into a cube, or of a kitchen table used only at night when everyone else is asleep, and more recently such a kitchen table has reappeared as an experimental setup for drawing in space and time.
What do we know, though, about the experimental space of architecture, where architecture is learned and produced? What are its proportions, what materials does it have to be made of, what are its properties and what is its content? What is its name? Studio? Workshop? Atelier?
Let’s delete these names; let’s consider the state of the art of cultural studies and neurosciences; let’s take into account that our brains and our production tools are converging, and let’s start a project — let’s be as ambitious as possible; let’s take a working title, let’s call it »Deep Spaces«, in reference to the NASA programme of the same name that has the mission of studying and exploring the limits of space, the solar system and the universe as conceivable for humans. Deep Spaces, then, is the project of exploring the new experimental space of architecture: no more studios, no more laboratories — from now on, Deep Spaces.